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National Council of Negro Women, Inc.• 633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW• Washington, DC 20004
Tel. 202-737-0120 / Fax 202-737-0476
Save Our Babies Summit Black Men Revealed
"Living With Purpose" Women to Women: Planning Your Secure Future Night of One Hundred Stars Fact Sheet 136th Bethune Birthday Celebration Historic White House Signing Vote 2012 Video African American Women's Organization | National Council of Negro Women | NCNW

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SAVE THE DATE • JULY 10, 2015
Mary McLeod Bethune
140th Commemorative Birthday

For more information click here.

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HIV/AIDS AWARENESS DAY
July 11, 2015

NCNW hosts the 7th Annual HIV Testing Event. For more information, click here.

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PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA DELIVERS UNFORGETTABLE EULOGY for the
Honorable Reverend Clementa Pinckney

Pinckney Eulogy

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RACE AND VIOLENCE IN AMERICA

There are moments that the brain cannot fathom.
That the mind cannot hold fast. 
That the heart cannot let go. 
There are moments when everything shifts
and shudders 
And changes so completely that in years to come, 
We will mark time in before and after that moment.

Wish You Were Here (In memorium)
 A Poem by Pearl Cleage

As a country grappling with issues like affordable healthcare, education reform, and economic stability, the mass shooting in the Emanuel A. M. E. Church in Charleston, SC, is a shocking reminder that race and violence in America have become shamelessly reacquainted. The senseless mass shooting has shaken a community and a nation and is only made more horrifying by where it happened and by whom.  A 21-year old white man gunned down African American churchgoers attending a Wednesday night Bible class.

The motive for the massacre was simply racism. I do not subscribe to the belief that the shooter was just another crazy man. His friends have verified his racist rants and social media has documented his photos. His actions at Emanuel A. M. E. were calculated and his deadly intentions premeditated. He acted on his hatred. That is our truth. Racism has reared its ugly head and reminded a nation of its despicable and grisly past. Racism has tenacious roots in American soil but it does not have to spread like persistent bindweed into future generations. The National Council of Negro Women is an organization committed to advocating for women of African descent and their families and communities; we have a responsibility and a duty to continue the public debate and dialogue that will advance greater understanding of the issue of race and violence in this country and we will do so.

While the courts begin the legal proceedings for the gunman and families begin the painful ordeal of saying good-bye to their loved ones, it is important to not be distracted by the headlines and sound bites. How long the massacre was planned-doesn't matter. Where the shooter got the gun-doesn't matter. That he had black Facebook friends-doesn't matter. What matters most is how we as a nation respond and reckon with this kind of violence. Crimes against African Americans because of race are a significant part of America's shameful history. The laws against such crimes have been refined over the years to increase the penalties based on race, color, religion, national origin, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation. Today forty-five (45) states and the District of Columbia have statutes criminalizing forms of hate crimes and yet funerals are being planned for victims of a hate crime committed in a church. Stiffer gun law legislation will make it more difficult for racists to get a weapon. As Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, "It may be true that the law cannot change the heart, but it can restrain the heartless."

There are some piercing questions that we have to ask ourselves if we hope to avoid Charleston's pain in another city: How can we earnestly tackle the racial demons of our past? What can we do to collectively dehumanize hate? What can each of us do to affect change?  Answering these questions strike me as our most abiding obligation to Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Rev. Daniel Simmons, Sr., Rev. Depayne Middleton-Doctor, Cynthia Hurd, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lance, Tywanza Sanders, Sharonda Singleton and Myra Thompson.  May God bless and keep their families.

Ingrid Saunders Jones
National Chair

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NCNW COLLEGIATE SECTION SPOTLIGHT

We are proud to announce Ms. Ariana Brazier as Miss Spelman College, 2015-2016. Ms. Brazier has been a faithful and active member of our NCNW Spelman Collegiate Section. She is also the president of that Section. We have no doubt that she will fulfill her obligations with untiring devotion and insurmountable determination. CONGRATS!

What's NCNW noteworthy on your campus? Send us your information — you could be our next Spotlight!

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HAPPY 103rd BIRTHDAY
DR. DOROTHY I. HEIGHT

You should have been there! A good time was had by all. Click here to see photo gallery.

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Home | About Us | Centers & Programs | Events | Resources | How You Can Help | Contact Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy
National Council of Negro Women, Inc.• 633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW• Washington, DC 20004
Tel. 202-737-0120 / Fax 202-737-0476
Save Our Babies Summit Black Men Revealed
"Living With Purpose" Women to Women: Planning Your Secure Future Night of One Hundred Stars Fact Sheet 136th Bethune Birthday Celebration Historic White House Signing Vote 2012 Video